Hadis Qudsi – 21 ~ Balasan syurga orang cacat yang bersyukur

Berkata Al-Irbadh bin Sariyah r.a. bahawasanya Nabi SAW telah bersabda: Allah Taala telah berfirman:

“Jika Aku meregut anggota hamba-Ku, padahal ia sangat memerlukannya, lalu ia mengucap Alhamdulillah atas bala itu, Aku tidak rela membalasnya selain dari syurga .” (Riwayat Thabrani, Ibnu Hibban dan Abu Nu’aim)

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Tanda serangan sakit jantung pada wanita

Selain daripada tanda serangan sakit jantung yang biasa dialami oleh orang lelaki, ada juga wanita yang menunjukkan tanda-tanda serangan sakit jantung yang agak berbeza. Ini menyebabkan wanita yang menunjukkan tanda-tanda yang berbeza ini tidak mendapat rawatan kecemasan yang sewajarnya.

Di antara tanda-tanda lain serangan sakit jantung pada sesetengah wanita ialah nafas pendek, badan lemah dan keletihan yang luar biasa. Tanda-tanda tambahan lain ialah rasa mual, pening, rasa tidak selesa di bahagian dada bawah dan rasa sakit di belakang sebelah atas.

Maklumat lanjut dipanjangkan dalam artikel berikut….

Do You Know Which Symptoms Signal a Heart Attack in Women?

Women’s heart attacks are different than men’s. Learn the warning signs.

By Katherine Kam
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

Most women know the symptoms of male heart attacks — squeezing chest pain, shortness of breath, nausea. But as it turns out, the symptoms of female heart attacks can be quite different – and it’s important for all women to learn the warning signs.

For instance, Rhonda Monroe was mystified when strong pain struck her left breast and left arm. Monroe, who was a 36-year-old mother of three, didn’t know it at the time, but she was having early symptoms of a heart attack. “I certainly wasn’t thinking about my heart because I was young and healthy and had been skinny,” she says.

As the pain moved into her shoulder and back, Monroe took pain relievers and showered for relief. But the next day, she was overwhelmed with nausea, sweating, vomiting, and chest pain. An ambulance rushed her to the emergency room.

Her next hurdle: getting the doctors to believe her. “They didn’t take me seriously,” Monroe says. She didn’t fit the profile of a heart attack patient. The doctors told her she was too young, she was not overweight, and there was no family history of heart disease.

Bedeviled by worsening pain and weakness and convinced she was dying, Monroe returned to the hospital several times over the days that followed, only to come home with no answers. “I was angry and frustrated,” the West Virginia resident says.

Monroe turned to her primary care physician about her situation and went through more tests at the hospital. Finally, she got her diagnosis — a week after the initial breast and arm pain. As Monroe recalls, a cardiologist who had previously dismissed her complaints made the diagnosis. “The doctor told me, ‘Well, it’s a good thing you’re persistent because you’re having a heart attack.’”

Heart experts say Monroe’s situation is all too common. Women who have “atypical” symptoms, such as arm or back pain or nausea, might not realize at first that they’re having a heart attack. Then when they do seek emergency care, doctors sometimes misdiagnose them.

Female heart attack symptoms

“Typical” heart attack symptoms include chest pressure or squeezing or stabbing sensations in the center or left side of the chest, says Myung H. Park, MD, FACC, who is director of the Pulmonary Vascular Diseases Program at the University of Maryland Medical Center. “It’s very typical for people to make a fist when they’re describing their symptoms,” she says. “Some people describe it as feeling like a vise encasing their whole chest area.”

But in women, symptoms are more likely to be atypical: Although most women experience chest pain or discomfort, many don’t. In a 2003 Circulation study of female heart attack patients, scientists found that during an attack, 43% of the 515 women studied had no “acute chest pain, a ‘hallmark symptom in men.’”

The study noted some common female heart attack symptoms:

• shortness of breath (57.9%)

• weakness (54.8%)

• unusual fatigue (42.9%)

Women had other atypical heart attack symptoms, too: nausea, dizziness, lower chest discomfort, upper abdominal pressure or discomfort that feels like indigestion, and upper back pain.

Often, women are unfamiliar with these atypical symptoms and blame them on heartburn or indigestion, arthritis, or stress, experts say. If they become short of breath with little exertion, they tell themselves they are out of shape, overworked, or fatigued.

Pay attention to heart attack symptoms

But experts urge women to learn the various heart attack symptoms and to call 911 promptly at the appearance of these signs. While every woman feels indigestion once in a while, experiencing a cluster of unusual symptoms or a sensation in the chest or stomach never felt before is reason to seek emergency care. Park has seen too many patients wait too long. Because women have lots of competing demands — jobs, families, and sometimes caregiving duties — “taking care of themselves, even if they don’t feel well, usually doesn’t make it to the top of the list,” she says.

That can be dangerous, experts say. “The longer a woman waits before getting treatment to open the blocked blood vessel to the heart, the more damage is done to the heart muscle. If a large amount of the heart muscle is damaged, the woman will be at risk for heart failure,” says Teresa Caulin-Glaser, MD, co-author of The Woman’s Heart: An Owner’s Guide and director of preventive cardiology and research at McConnell Heart Health Center in Columbus, Ohio.

Assert yourself if you have heart attack symptoms

Unfortunately, doctors who are not familiar with atypical symptoms may overlook a woman’s heart attack, experts tell WebMD. In fact, according to the Circulation study, women have more unrecognized heart attacks than men and are more likely to be “mistakenly diagnosed and discharged from emergency departments.”

Be direct with doctors and other medical staff, Caulin-Glaser says: “Women arriving at the emergency room should state clearly that they think they are having a heart attack and need to be evaluated.”

At a minimum, an immediate evaluation should include being placed on oxygen, taking aspirin, having blood drawn, having an electrocardiogram performed, and receiving a cardiac monitor within minutes of arrival, she says.

Being bold can save women’s lives, Caulin-Glaser adds. “If the triage nurse or emergency room physician does not take their concerns seriously and begin the immediate evaluation for a heart attack, then all women should tell the emergency room physician they want to be seen by a cardiologist.”

Shortly after Monroe’s heart attack was finally diagnosed, she underwent emergency quadruple bypass surgery. She reports that she didn’t know all the right questions to ask when she first felt symptoms, “but I definitely knew that something was wrong.”

Now she urges other women who believe they might be having a heart attack to advocate for themselves. “Persist. No one knows your body the way you do,” Monroe says. “I really believe the only reason I’m alive today is that I wouldn’t give up, and I wouldn’t relent.”

Source

Today’s Quote – 152

“Everything has its beauty but not everyone sees it.” ~ Confucius

Terkini: Gempa bumi di Jepun mengubah paksi dunia

Dulu masa tsunami di Acheh tahun 2004 dikatakan paksi bumi pun telah sedikit berubah, dan tsunami yang melanda Jepun inipun, yang kekuatannya hampir sama dengan yang pernah berlaku di Acheh, juga telah mengubah lagi paksi bumi. Nampaknya paksi bumi telah banyak berubah, adakah ini tanda-tanda awal akan musnah dan berakhirnya dunia ini? sama-sama kita insafi…..

Quake moved Japan coast 8 feet, shifted Earth’s axis

By Kevin Voigt, CNN
March 12, 2011 — Updated 2101 GMT (0501 HKT)

Images released by NASA show Japan’s northeast coast before, left, and after flooding from the quake-induced tsunami.

(CNN) — The powerful earthquake that unleashed a devastating tsunami Friday appears to have moved the main island of Japan by 8 feet (2.4 meters) and shifted the Earth on its axis.

“At this point, we know that one GPS station moved (8 feet), and we have seen a map from GSI (Geospatial Information Authority) in Japan showing the pattern of shift over a large area is consistent with about that much shift of the land mass,” said Kenneth Hudnut, a geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

Reports from the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology in Italy estimated the 8.9-magnitude quake shifted the planet on its axis by nearly 4 inches (10 centimeters).

The temblor, which struck Friday afternoon near the east coast of Japan, killed hundreds of people, caused the formation of 30-foot walls of water that swept across rice fields, engulfed entire towns, dragged houses onto highways, and tossed cars and boats like toys. Some waves reached six miles (10 kilometers) inland in Miyagi Prefecture on Japan’s east coast.

The quake was the most powerful to hit the island nation in recorded history and the tsunami it unleashed traveled across the Pacific Ocean, triggering tsunami warnings and alerts for 50 countries and territories as far away as the western coasts of Canada, the U.S. and Chile. The quake triggered more than 160 aftershocks in the first 24 hours — 141 measuring 5.0-magnitude or more.

The quake occurred as the Earth’s crust ruptured along an area about 250 miles (400 kilometers) long by 100 miles (160 kilometers) wide, as tectonic plates slipped more than 18 meters, said Shengzao Chen, a USGS geophysicist.

Japan is located along the Pacific “ring of fire,” an area of high seismic and volcanic activity stretching from New Zealand in the South Pacific up through Japan, across to Alaska and down the west coasts of North and South America. The quake was “hundreds of times larger” than the 2010 quake that ravaged Haiti, said Jim Gaherty of the LaMont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University.

The Japanese quake was of similar strength to the 2004 earthquake in Indonesia that triggered a tsunami that killed over 200,000 people in more than a dozen countries around the Indian Ocean. “The tsunami that it sent out was roughly comparable in terms of size,” Gaherty said. “[The 2004 tsunami] happened to hit some regions that were not very prepared for tsunamis … we didn’t really have a very sophisticated tsunami warning system in the Indian Ocean basin at the time so the damage was significantly worse.”

The Japanese quake comes just weeks after a 6.3-magnitude earthquake struck Christchurch on February 22, toppling historic buildings and killing more than 150 people. The timeframe of the two quakes have raised questions whether the two incidents are related, but experts say the distance between the two incidents makes that unlikely.

“I would think the connection is very slim,” said Prof. Stephan Grilli, ocean engineering professor at the University of Rhode Island.

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